Monday, April 15, 2019 - 06:16 • Soila Apparicio

Miles from the river Thames, a boat brought central London to a standstill on Monday as campaign group Extinction Rebellion launched an international protest demanding action on climate change.

The Berta Cáceres docked in the middle of the Oxford Circus junction, one of five locations across London, as part of synchronised action taking place across 33 countries globally, including in the United States, Germany, Ghana, and New Zealand.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 01:19 • Mike Small
Read time: 7 mins

The Extinction Rebellion protest movement has grown in scale and impact in recent weeks, bringing energy and chaos to the streets as people wake up to grim climate realities. Alongside the School Strikes, the new movement has been a massive, joyful, peaceful wake-up call to conservative environmentalists and compromised politicians alike. 

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 - 12:47 • Sophie Yeo
Read time: 5 mins

ExxonMobil will retain its ability to lobby the European Parliament after MEPs refused to take away their badges.

The ability of the oil major to meet with Brussels decisionmakers was under question after the company refused to attend a hearing on their history of climate denial, citing ongoing litigation in the US.

Party presidents within the European Parliament decided against banning ExxonMobil in a meeting last week. Instead, they pushed the decision to a smaller group of MEPs, known as ‘quaestors’, and to Klaus Welle, the Secretary General of the European Parliament.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 - 07:09 • Mat Hope
Read time: 7 mins

Polly Higgins is a woman on the hunt. And you get the sense that, after decades of working towards holding powerful polluters to account, her prey may finally be in sight.

When you're looking at any crime, you're looking at who are your suspects,” she tells me in a soft Scottish accent that belies the hard truths she regularly delivers. “Within a corporate context, you're looking at CEOs and directors. Within a state context, it is ministers and Heads of State.”

Monday, April 15, 2019 - 01:21 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

By Natalie Sauer for Climate Home News

The World Bank Group faces criticism for continuing to back fossil fuel development, despite moves to clean up its portfolio.

It has earned green credentials for ending direct lending to coal-fired power plants, promising to axe support for oil and gas exploration and increasing its clean energy budget.

Yet over the last five years, the group’s support to oil and gas actually increased, while coal benefitted from indirect subsidies, according to analysis from German NGO Urgewald.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 04:01 • Mat Hope
Read time: 11 mins

Image: Kristian Buus ©


Simon Roscoe Blevins swears softly, compulsively, and often. The criminal justice system is “shit”, he says. Fracking? It’s “fucked”.

He’s a man familiar with both. Last year, he was one of four protestors jailed for stopping a convoy of lorries going to a fracking site in Lancashire. His expletive-laden jibes aren’t borne of aggression, so much as a deep-rooted frustration about the politics of shale gas extraction in the UK.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 01:53 • Guest
Read time: 5 mins

By Paul Brown for Climate News Network

Candidates promising to fight for clean drinking water and a halt to pollution are likely to gain the support of millions of Indian voters.

Environmental issues, particularly clean water and air, traffic congestion and better public transport, are among the top priorities of urban voters as they prepare to vote in the world’s largest general election.

Monday, April 8, 2019 - 05:38 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

British video activist Shaun Dey was one of two members of Reel News who went to North America last year to make films about grassroots struggles around climate change, particularly around the ideas of “just transition” and “just recovery”. He reflects on his experience of travelling the region for 14 weeks.

When Trump got into power, we immediately wanted to get over to the States and see what was happening. We knew there were a lot of grassroots movements in the States coming together around climate change, and that refreshingly it was a movement led by working-class communities of colour.

What were all those activists doing now that a climate science denier was President?

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